Style Cycles: Olympic Fever

Fashion fades, style is eternal – Yves Saint Laurent

Olympic posters

The 1932 Los Angeles summer Olympics sparked a trend for Olympic colours on items from bead necklaces to Bakelite bangles (centre), scarves and hat bands. Read more here

Vivienne Westwood menswear S/S 2012. Read more about Olympic fashion history here and here.

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About Amber Jane

Amber Jane Butchart has had a lifelong love affair with dressing up and has turned this obsession into a career as a fashion historian, writer and broadcaster. She is an Associate Lecturer in Cultural & Historical Studies at London College of Fashion, where she lectures across a number of areas concerning fashion, the body and contemporary culture, from the impact of blogging on fashion media to fashion and the grotesque. Shot by Vogue as a girl with great British style and a featured fashion historian on various BBC productions, her interest in antique clothing was ignited by working as Head Buyer for vintage clothing company Beyond Retro. Her blog, Theatre of Fashion, tracks current trends through history to reveal the secrets of our sartorial past. She has contributed to productions for BBC 1 & 2, BBC Learning, Radio 4, Channel 4 and Sky Arts, from the Breakfast News to Making History and Woman's Hour. She also presents a regular ‘In Conversation’ series at the V&A museum looking at issues concerning the clothed body in fashion and performance, and for 5 years she was a regular contributor to leading trend analysis company WGSN. As the red-haired half of the Sony-nominated Broken Hearts DJ duo she co-hosts a weekly radio show on Jazz FM that celebrates inter-war culture and the trends that the era continues to influence from fashion to food, film and literature; and as live DJs they have graced stages across the globe for the likes of Marc Jacobs, Vivienne Westwood and Louis Vuitton. A former Research Fellow at the University of the Arts London, Amber has also lectured and sat on panels at the Institute for Contemporary Arts, British Museum, Royal Academy, British Library and SHOWstudio.
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